After the Days of Infamy by A.G. Kimbrough - PDF free download eBook

4.5 from 81 reviews

December 7, 1941 Captain Minoru Genda smiled as the last plane landed on the Kaga. Both attacks had succeeded beyond his...

Looking for after days infamy pdf to download for free? Use our file search system, download the e-book for computer, smartphone or online reading.

Search & Download

Details of After the Days of Infamy

Exact title of the book
After the Days of Infamy
Book author
A.G. Kimbrough
Book edition
Kindle Edition
Number of pages
172 pages
ISBN (ASIN)
B07JLVPGXD
Published
November 16th 2018
File size (in PDF)
688 kB
After the Days of Infamy

Some brief overview of book

December 7, 1941 Captain Minoru Genda smiled as the last plane landed on the Kaga. Both attacks had succeeded beyond his wildest expectations, and the second wave, had not lost a single plane. The losses on the initial attack were much less than projected.

As the four carriers started turning, he saw the smoke rising over the burning ships and oil storage tanks. Even from 50 miles away, and at an 8,000 foot altitude, he could see that the smoke column height was way above his vantage point on the carrier bridge. After a stop a 1000 miles West of Portland Oregon for their support ships, to resupply fuel, armaments, and replacement planes, the carrier airship fleet will bring destruction to the American West Coast before the end of the week.

This book departs from reality with the 1932 discovery of helium on the island of Hokido. A secret agreement between Japan and Germany results in a technology exchange that enables Japan to develop a fleet of huge airship aircraft carriers. The two attacks on December Seventh are made by over 300 planes from a fleet of four airship carriers.

By the end of that week, a series of devastating strikes up and down the West Coast leave the aircraft, shipbuilding, and marine industries in ruins. This story does not include steam punk, fantasy, time travel, magic, elves or faeries. It does include some adult content, as well as fictional actions by the USS Fletcher and the USS Iowa.

The deviations from historic technologies are based on what could have been accomplished with the availability of helium and a push in that direction.